Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Three Generations

While putting away some quilts in one of my old trunks I came across this little treasure and thought I would share it with you.


My mom gave me the log cabin blocks when she was cleaning out to move to St George. She also gave the rest of the fabric she had been using when she started her quilt. The little stitcheries my grandma made on dishtowels for me when I got married. Now if I had been wiser and more mature at the time I would have never used those precious dishtowels. Look how sweet this little stitcheries are. The little dutch girls a symbol of my rich heritage.Sadly Wednesday is stained and Thursday and Sunday are missing all together. But fortunately I wised up before all was lost. I cut them into blocks. Put them with Mom's log cabins. Added sashing, did a little quilting. I was very new at this at the time and not sure how to quilt the stitchery blocks. So I left them unquilted. Still would like to do something in them but don't want to ruin or distract from the stitchery. Suggestions are always welcome, ladies.

So there you have it a three generation quilt. In need of a little more help from the third generation.

12 comments:

  1. Those are adorable!! What a treasure. I'll be really interested tos ee what suggestions you get for quilting around the stitchery.

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  2. What a treasure. Every once in a while we get to witness your family historical record. These items pop up in unique ways, so very 'along the way' of life and joyful.

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  3. To be honest...I would not touch them. Since this is a very special heirloom and will not need to hold up against use, I would leave them just as your grandmother made them...I wouldn't get rid of the stain either as it adds history and character to your quilt story...you may want to see through some research if you might be able to find the missing days that you could stitch or have someone else finish for you.

    I am sure whatever you decide though, it will be the right decision for you...your work is always my absolute favorite.

    XOXO
    Marlene

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  4. How sweet! I well remember some dishtowels that my mother embroidered shortly after she got married. Wish we still had them!

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  5. Thanks for sharing that, Em! It is lovely family memorabilia!
    Hugs - Lurline♥

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  6. A lightbulb has just gone off in my head as I still have all the dishtowels that my husband's aunt embroidered for me as a shower gift. They were so beautiful and I have never been able to use them. I think I know what to do with them now instead of keeping them in my cedar chest. Thanks for the idea.

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  7. They are wonderful and it looks great in a quilt. Cross hatching is always a good traditional way to quilt these types of blocks. You can do it by machine or hand. Good luck!

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  8. What a treasured keepsake you have there... I share in your heritage. 8-)

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  9. What an excellent way to save your grandmother's work. I had a Sunbonnet Sue quilt as a wedding gift from an aunt. I'm so sorry now that I used it and washed it to death. My daughters loved having it on their bed though so maybe it wasn't totally wasted.

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  10. I love the fact that this has been worked on by three generations! That is a great heirloom!

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  11. What a great idea. A wonderful treasure for years to come.

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  12. I wish I was good at this. Or even liked doing it. Lovely work.

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