Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Tuesday Tutorial~ On Point

I really like to put quilts on point. The look really appeals to me. I like the look so much that when we tiled our home I had them put it on point. 
Mary's Garden
 It does involve a little math though. This math is based on the Pythagorean theorem. Which when I was in school I thought I would never use and thus did not pay much attention to. Not until helping my oldest with his math did I find the true value of this great theorem.
Dazzled
 It states that squaring the two legs of a triangle and adding them together equals the hypotenuse squared. In other words  a2 + b2 = c2
Mountain Retreat
 When setting a quilt on point your legs are the same. 2a² =c²  round up to the nearest measurement on your ruler. Then add 1" for seam allowance. Cut a square this size and cut on diagonal twice. This will give you your setting triangles. Example if your block finishes at 6". 2x6²= c²  If you do the math you will get √72. This equals 8.49. Round to 9 and add your 1 3/4". Which gives you 10 3/4". Cut an 10 3/4" square and cut it on diagonal twice.
Union
 For your corners you go in reverse as the hypotenuse is our known number and we are trying to find our legs. c² = 2a². Using the same 6 would be c. So 6²= 2a². Which gives us 36 that we then divide by 2 giving us √18. Which equals 4.24. Round to 4.25 and add 1" for seam allowance. So cut a 5 1/4" square cut on diagonal once.
Multiplicity 
 I understand that for some of you math may not be your strong point. No worries. Bonnie Hunter has a chart that gives sizes of blocks along with setting and corner triangles here. Sorry if I confused you with all the math but I like to know why and how things work and thought there might be a few of you out there that would too.
Mountain Blossoms
 Just a heads up next week we will have a link up and giveaway.  If you have used a tutorial you have found here be prepared to link up and win a chance for your choice of one of my patterns in pdf format.

10 comments:

  1. math is not my strong suit - I hate - I love quilts on point though and I just do it my own way! I didn't know Bonnie H had a chart though so next time I might check it out.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'd say that is "Fun with Math". Interesting and useful :-) Thanks for explaining that!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Another reason we should love our math classes!!!! I love quilts on point.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is great information! But you lost me at round to 9 and add 1 3/4". Why are we adding 1 1 3/4? Earlier in the tutorial you said add 1" for seam allowance so where did the 1 3/4" come from? I am confused!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The 1 3/4" is for the setting triangles and the 1" is for the corner triangles. Let me know if you have further questions.

      Delete
  5. Ditto Janice's comments. Additionally, when you add the two numbers together it equals 10 3/4" not 11 3/4".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your right sorry for the math error. I've fixed it. Thanks! Also the 1 3/4" is for setting triangles and 1" is for corner triangles. Sorry that was confusing.

      Delete
  6. The part I can never figure out is HOW MANY blocks I would need to set a quilt on point to get the desired size of quilt.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Maths has never been my strong point, but I enjoyed reading this! I tend to lay everything out on my 'design floor' and workout the setting triangles from there! I cut them all a bit larger to ensure I've got it covered!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Fun with math and quilts, I love it!

    ReplyDelete